We Are Change Huerfano
© 2017 We Are Change Huerfano
Research
Commentary of Bruce Kettler: Before looking at the “academically acceptable criteria,” it is necessary to understand that no one source, no matter how credible that source would normally be considered, should be considered as the criteria of facts. Here is one example. If one architect, or one engineer, stated that the official story regarding the events of September 11, 2001 is impossible, that story being fire, and/or impact of airplanes, brought down 2 buildings in NYC., that statement from one architect, or one engineer, would not be enough to consider it a fact. Then, for proper research one would not consider the statement of the organization about the 1,500 Architects and Engineers to be fact, just because they said so. One would ask for the documentation containing the statements of the Architects and Engineers. Even then, that documentation would not have been verified. A random sample of sufficient size would be taken, and each of the Architects and Engineer’s credentials, and work history, would be examined. Then, that sample of persons would have to be contacted, and the fact that they took part in the documentation and statements would be verified. Beware of the word, “expert” in the criteria listed below. Just because a person is a professor in a prestigious university, does not mean that everything they say, or write, is true. I’ve read statements of Law Professors that are obviously false. Here is one example regarding the “supremacy clause” in the U.S. Constitution. Proper research would involve examination of a variety of credible sources, and your own intelligent evaluation of what they write, or say, based upon the sources each of them cite. There is reference, below, to authors credentials. Credentials, alone, should not be the criteria to decide upon the veracity of what that person writes. A person with absolutely no credentials can write true accounts, and viable evaluation of that information. That person may have been home schooled, with no official examinations. Some people school themselves to Masters, and PhD levels. Ask any “jail house lawyer” questions about criminal law, and they understand what they need to. They were required to understand it for their own freedom, and survival. They learned from other self-taught “experts” who had experience with using the law, and from their own reading and research. So, examine the sources the author uses in his/her writing. The fact that a source of so-called “information” used to be be universally considered “official,” because it is CNN, ABC, CBS, The New York Times, etc. does not mean every word that comes from their corrupted “mouths” is true. Neither does alternative media always write, or say, the truth. I’ll not go into examples on that matter at this time. Fact is, polls show increasing distrust of media in the U.S., Whether it’s Alex Jones, or some “talking head” in the “lamestream” TV media, examine what is stated, very carefully. Even historical accounts require careful scrutiny. To give one example, if you are examining WWII history, look at the archived newspaper accounts from a variety of sources. Do they match up with the historical account you are looking at.? Read my article, The Pathology of Blind Denial so you know how important it is to do research. Research project: Is there a new world order in control? Here’s how you do it. It’s really simple. Here is a BIBLIOGRAPHYHere is a video.  You go through the video, and wherever there is a reference to DOCUMENTATION (minutes and seconds) (it is, after all, a documentary) you explore that documentation noted in the BIBLIOGRAPHY. I sampled 3 textbooks to indicate highlights of College Level teaching about how to conduct research, to be sure one's writing includes valid information: 1. Rules for Writers, Second Edition, Diana Hacker; 1988; St. Martin Press, Inc. 2. Twenty Questions for the Writer, Third Edition, Jacqueline Berke: 1981; Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc. 3. The Brief New Century Handbook, Third Edition; 2005; Christine A Hult Thomas N. Huckin, Pearson Longman                                            In book 3, chapter 7 is named "The Research Project."  It's about using "information from external sources."  In section 7a the writer instructs the student to use "appropriate documentation." Section 7d explains how a bibliography is to show what sources were consulted to find information. Section 7f  tells of online database services such as Lexis-Nexis or EBSCOHost to find articles from magazines, newspapers, and professional journals. Section 8c tells how to use search tools on the internet.  Web sites are listed for academic information, online journals listed by academic subject, census data, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Labor Statistics, Library of Congress, and much more. In Chapter 9, good advice is given to "...evaluate what you read.  The tendency to believe everything one reads is dangerous, especially with respect to internet sources." Section 9a tells us to "...choose legitimate sources."  There's a discussion of how, for some subjects, a professional journal can be more scholarly to quote from, than the popular press.  It's explained that evaluation of an author's credentials is important. In book 1, Chapter 51 is titled, "Researching." Because this is an older book, the physical library is indicated as the primary source of information, rather than computers. The book lists reference works such as... encyclopedias specialized encyclopedias biographical references atlases almanacs and year books unabridged dictionaries Three types of catalogs are listed to locate books: microfilm computer card The chapter goes on to explain what a card catalog shows, using an actual sample card to illustrate. Sample Library of Congress Subject headings are shown, as well as magazine and newspaper indexes and specialized periodical indexes. Section 51d is titled, "Evaluate sources for relevance and reliability."  In that section it says, "By reading book reviews, you can learn whether a book was well received by experts..."  It also informs us that "Biographical directories in many fields list the publications of well-known scholars; checking these will help establish the  author." Book number 2, also an older one, has a section titled "Research: Major Reference Sources"  Again, the outdated physical card catalog is illustrated as a method to find books in the library. The primary research tools are listed: Encyclopedias Biographical Works Dictionaries Yearbooks and Almanacs The author tells of the "reference librarian who's job is to guide researchers..."  The book tells the reader that a person can obtain an "interlibrary loan." Then there's... special reference books general bibliographies periodical indexes and abstracts government publications pamphlets
Research - according to academically acceptable criteria - to prove veracity of information
Compiled by Bruce Kettler   UPDATED 11/27/14
We Are Change Huerfano
© 2017 We Are Change Huerfano
Research
Commentary of Bruce Kettler: Before looking at the “academically acceptable criteria,” it is necessary to understand that no one source, no matter how credible that source would normally be considered, should be considered as the criteria of facts. Here is one example. If one architect, or one engineer, stated that the official story regarding the events of September 11, 2001 is impossible, that story being fire, and/or impact of airplanes, brought down 2 buildings in NYC., that statement from one architect, or one engineer, would not be enough to consider it a fact. Then, for proper research one would not consider the statement of the organization about the 1,500 Architects and Engineers to be fact, just because they said so. One would ask for the documentation containing the statements of the Architects and Engineers. Even then, that documentation would not have been verified. A random sample of sufficient size would be taken, and each of the Architects and Engineer’s credentials, and work history, would be examined. Then, that sample of persons would have to be contacted, and the fact that they took part in the documentation and statements would be verified. Beware of the word, “expert” in the criteria listed below. Just because a person is a professor in a prestigious university, does not mean that everything they say, or write, is true. I’ve read statements of Law Professors that are obviously false. Here is one example regarding the “supremacy clause” in the U.S. Constitution. Proper research would involve examination of a variety of credible sources, and your own intelligent evaluation of what they write, or say, based upon the sources each of them cite. There is reference, below, to authors credentials. Credentials, alone, should not be the criteria to decide upon the veracity of what that person writes. A person with absolutely no credentials can write true accounts, and viable evaluation of that information. That person may have been home schooled, with no official examinations. Some people school themselves to Masters, and PhD levels. Ask any “jail house lawyer” questions about criminal law, and they understand what they need to. They were required to understand it for their own freedom, and survival. They learned from other self-taught “experts” who had experience with using the law, and from their own reading and research. So, examine the sources the author uses in his/her writing. The fact that a source of so-called “information” used to be be universally considered “official,” because it is CNN, ABC, CBS, The New York Times, etc. does not mean every word that comes from their corrupted “mouths” is true. Neither does alternative media always write, or say, the truth. I’ll not go into examples on that matter at this time. Fact is, polls show increasing distrust of media in the U.S., Whether it’s Alex Jones, or some “talking head” in the “lamestream” TV media, examine what is stated, very carefully. Even historical accounts require careful scrutiny. To give one example, if you are examining WWII history, look at the archived newspaper accounts from a variety of sources. Do they match up with the historical account you are looking at.? Read my article, The Pathology of Blind Denial so you know how important it is to do research. Research project: Is there a new world order in control?  Here’s how you do it. It’s really simple. Here is a BIBLIOGRAPHYHere is a video.  You go through the video, and wherever there is a reference to DOCUMENTATION (minutes and seconds) (it is, after all, a documentary) you explore that documentation noted in the BIBLIOGRAPHY. I sampled 3 textbooks to indicate highlights of College Level teaching about how to conduct research, to be sure one's writing includes valid information: 1. Rules for Writers, Second Edition, Diana Hacker; 1988; St. Martin Press, Inc. 2. Twenty Questions for the Writer, Third Edition, Jacqueline Berke: 1981; Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc. 3. The Brief New Century Handbook, Third Edition; 2005; Christine A Hult Thomas N. Huckin, Pearson Longman                                            In book 3, chapter 7 is named "The Research Project."  It's about using "information from external sources."  In section 7a the writer instructs the student to use "appropriate documentation." Section 7d explains how a bibliography is to show what sources were consulted to find information. Section 7f  tells of online database services such as Lexis-Nexis or EBSCOHost to find articles from magazines, newspapers, and professional journals. Section 8c tells how to use search tools on the internet.  Web sites are listed for academic information, online journals listed by academic subject, census data, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Labor Statistics, Library of Congress, and much more. In Chapter 9, good advice is given to "...evaluate what you read.  The tendency to believe everything one reads is dangerous, especially with respect to internet sources." Section 9a tells us to "...choose legitimate sources."  There's a discussion of how, for some subjects, a professional journal can be more scholarly to quote from, than the popular press.  It's explained that evaluation of an author's credentials is important. In book 1, Chapter 51 is titled, "Researching." Because this is an older book, the physical library is indicated as the primary source of information, rather than computers. The book lists reference works such as... encyclopedias specialized encyclopedias biographical references atlases almanacs and year books unabridged dictionaries Three types of catalogs are listed to locate books: microfilm computer card The chapter goes on to explain what a card catalog shows, using an actual sample card to illustrate. Sample Library of Congress Subject headings are shown, as well as magazine and newspaper indexes and specialized periodical indexes. Section 51d is titled, "Evaluate sources for relevance and reliability."  In that section it says, "By reading book reviews, you can learn whether a book was well received by experts..."  It also informs us that "Biographical directories in many fields list the publications of well- known scholars; checking these will help establish the  author." Book number 2, also an older one, has a section titled "Research: Major Reference Sources"  Again, the outdated physical card catalog is illustrated as a method to find books in the library. The primary research tools are listed: Encyclopedias Biographical Works Dictionaries Yearbooks and Almanacs The author tells of the "reference librarian who's job is to guide researchers..."  The book tells the reader that a person can obtain an "interlibrary loan." Then there's... special reference books general bibliographies periodical indexes and abstracts government publications pamphlets
Research - according to academically acceptable criteria - to prove veracity of information
Compiled by Bruce Kettler   UPDATED 11/27/14